“It’s almost like they have leprosy but all they have is poverty”

July 5th, 2011

RICHMOND, Va. — Ray Neblett, 46, returns to Gilpin Court to bring hope. The notorious housing project is one of Richmond’s toughest and most dangerous neighborhoods. Gilpin Court is also the city’s largest public housing project, with more than 2,000 residents. According to an article in Richmond Style Weekly, “The incomes in 80 percent of the neighborhood’s households fall below the poverty line of $15,000.”
Neblett said crime and poverty isolate children in Gilpin Court from opportunities and the rest of the city. The former Virginia Union student and his son, Ray Loney,24,  teamed up with a mission to “transform the inner-city, by transforming the inner-man.” Each year, since 2008, this father and son duo has held a free basketball camp at the Calhoun Community Center for neighboring children. The “Inner-City Basketball” camp focuses on agility, shooting and speed but more so, character. Neblett said the purpose of their camp is to use basketball as a platform to teach inner-city children character building skills and keep them off the streets.


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